GN Law - Our People News and TV

Do I need a solicitor for probate?

Our People - Andrew Guile
1 June, 2023

Probate is the legal process of administering an estate after someone dies. This can be a complex and time-consuming process, especially if the estate is large or has multiple beneficiaries. In the UK, a probate solicitor can help guide you through the probate process and ensure that everything is handled correctly.

In this article, we will discuss the role of a probate solicitor in the UK and whether or not you need one.

What is the role of a Probate Solicitor?

A probate solicitor can assist with a variety of tasks related to the probate process, including:

  1. Obtaining a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration
  2. Administering the Estate
  3. Resolving Disputes
  4. Advising on Tax Matters
  5. Locating Missing Beneficiaries
  6. Dealing with Overseas Assets
  7. Contesting a Will
  8. Administration of Trusts
  9. Professional Executorship
  10. Handling Business Interests
  11. Advising on Estate Planning
  12. Dealing with Debts
  13. Mediating Disputes
  14. Handling Complex Legal Issues

1. Obtaining a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration

A Grant of Probate (if there is a will) or Letters of Administration (if there is no will) are legal documents that are usually required to give someone the authority to deal with a deceased person’s estate. A probate solicitor can help you obtain these documents from the Probate Registry.

2. Administering the Estate

A probate solicitor can assist with administering the estate, which involves collecting and valuing the assets, paying any debts and taxes, and distributing the remaining assets to the beneficiaries.

3. Resolving Disputes

If there are disputes between the beneficiaries or with creditors, a probate solicitor can help resolve them through mediation or, if necessary, litigation.

4. Advising on Tax Matters

A probate solicitor can advise on tax matters related to the estate, such as inheritance tax and capital gains tax.

5. Locating Missing Beneficiaries

If you are having difficulty locating a beneficiary, a probate solicitor can use their resources to help locate them.

6. Dealing with Overseas Assets

If the deceased had assets in another country, a probate solicitor can help navigate the complexities of dealing with overseas assets.

7. Contesting a Will

If you believe that the deceased’s will is invalid or that you have been unfairly left out of the will, a probate solicitor can assist with contesting the will.

8. Administration of Trusts

If the deceased had a trust, a probate solicitor can assist with the administration of the trust and ensure that the beneficiaries receive their entitlements.

9. Professional Executorship

In some cases, a probate solicitor may act as the executor of an estate. This can be beneficial if there are no family members or friends who are able to act as executor or if there are disputes between family members.

10. Handling Business Interests

If the deceased had business interests, a probate solicitor can help with transferring or selling these interests, as well as dealing with any tax issues related to the business.

11. Advising on Estate Planning

A probate solicitor can also provide advice on estate planning to help individuals plan their estates in a tax-efficient and effective manner.

12. Dealing with Debts

A probate solicitor can help with the identification and payment of any debts owed by the deceased, as well as dealing with any creditors who may be making claims against the estate.

13. Mediating Disputes

If there are disagreements between family members or beneficiaries, a probate solicitor can act as a mediator to help resolve disputes and prevent the need for litigation.

14. Handling Complex Legal Issues

In some cases, there may be complex legal issues that arise during the probate process, such as challenges to the validity of the will or issues with the distribution of assets. A probate solicitor can provide expertise in these areas and help navigate the legal complexities involved.

Overall, a probate solicitor can provide valuable assistance throughout the probate process, from obtaining the Grant of Probate to distributing assets to the beneficiaries. If you are unsure whether you need a probate solicitor, it is recommended to consult with one to assess your specific situation.

Do you need a probate solicitor?

If you are the executor of a will or need to administer an estate, it is highly advisable to instruct a probate solicitor to help guide you through the probate process and ensure that everything is handled correctly.

Personal representatives of an estate have a duty to collect all of the deceased’s estate and administer it according to law. If they carry out their duties incorrectly, they can become personally liable to creditors or beneficiaries of the estate for their actions (or inactions) while carrying out the administration.

These duties include identifying and dealing with the deceased’s debts and assets, taxes, properly distributing the estate and, when required to do so by the court, exhibiting on oath a full inventory of the estate and an account of the administration. All of these responsibilities can be complex and have a number of pitfalls which only an experienced professional will be aware of.

In most cases, personal representatives also remain representatives for life, even when the administration of the estate has been finalised, and so if assets or issues come to light after the administration is complete, the personal representatives will be liable to account for them, including any tax and interest that may be chargeable on these assets.

A probate solicitor can help ensure that the probate process is handled correctly and in compliance with UK law. They can also help you avoid mistakes that could lead to legal disputes or tax issues down the line. Additionally, a probate solicitor can help alleviate the stress and burden of dealing with the probate process, allowing you to focus on grieving and moving forward.

If you are a personal representative of an estate and need help with probate, please contact one of our specialist Probate Solicitors on 020 8492 2290 or email wtp@gnlaw.co.uk.

Related Articles

Probate without a will, also known as intestacy, presents a unique set of challenges in the UK's legal landscape. When an individual passes away without a will, the distribution of their estate is governed by specific rules, and the process involves obtaining a Grant of Letters of Administration.
Our People - Andrew Guile
When it comes to making important decisions about healthcare and personal matters, individuals have legal tools at their disposal to ensure their wishes are honoured. Two commonly used instruments are the Living Will and the Lasting Power of Attorney. Although both serve similar purposes, they differ in significant ways.
Our People - Chryso Loizides
In this article, we will discuss the differences between updating your will and adding a codicil and which option may be best for you.
Our People - Chryso Loizides
If you’re dealing with an estate which includes a house, flat or land which is to be sold or transferred, you are likely to need a grant of representation (probate, or letters of administration) to complete the transfer or sale.
Our People - Andrew Guile
An administrator of an estate is the person who looks after the probate process including valuing the estate, paying any inheritance tax due, applying for probate, collecting the assets and distributing the assets to the beneficiaries.
Our People - Andrew Guile
Probate can take anywhere from a few months to 1-2 years to complete. What are the key stages involved and what can delay the probate process?
Our People - Andrew Guile

Send a message

We will only use the information you enter in this form to contact you about your enquiry and will not share it with anyone else. Please read our Privacy Notice.

Please note that we are not accepting any new housing work at this time.